The head, the heart and the hand: architecture and its place in the Academy

Received: November 29, 2016
Accepted: November 29, 2016
Автори: 
Sebastian Macmillan

University of Cambridge, 1-5 Scroope Terrace, Cambridge CB2 1PX, United Kingdom

Architecture is a mainstream subject in the academy. While the development of spatial imagination and aesthetic judgment are among its core components, a wide range of knowledge, skills and sensitivities are delivered as part of the design curriculum. This paper discusses the potential benefits, but also the risks, associated with the growing emphasis on academically-focused research in schools of architecture. 

[1] For example MIT, Harvard, Cambridge – see QS World University Rankings, www.topuniversities.com. The Architecture departments in these three universities are ranked among the top six internationally. 

[2] Hunter, W. ‘New School of Architecture Launched’, Architectural Review, 1 October 2013, https://www.architectural-review.com/archive/new-school-of-architecture-....

[3] Bingham, N. 1993 ‘Architecture at the Royal Academy Schools 1768-1836,’ in Bingham, N (ed) The Education of the Architect, Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Symposium of the Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain. 

[4] Richardson, M. 1993 ‘Learning in the Soane office’, in Bingham, N (ed) The Education of the Architect, Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Symposium of the Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain.

[5] Saint, A. 2012 A History of the Architecture Department, http://www.arct.cam.ac.uk/aboutthedepartment/aboutthedepthome 

[6] Powers, A. 1993 ‘Arts & Crafts to Monumental Classic: the institutionalising of architectural education 1900-1914’, in Bingham, N (ed) The Education of the Architect, Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Symposium of the Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain. 

[7] Walker, L. 1993 ‘Architectural education and the entry of British women in to the profession’, in Bingham, N (ed) The Education of the Architect, Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Symposium of the Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain.

[8] Lubbock, J. and Crinson, M. 1993, ‘Education for change, 1938-1960: the creation of the “official system”’ in Bingham, N (ed) The Education of the Architect, Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Symposium of the Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain.

[9] Martin, L. 1958 ‘Conference on Architectural Education’, RIBA Journal, June 1958, pages 279-282.

[10] Llewelyn Davies, R. 1957 ‘Deeper knowledge, better design’, Architects’ Journal, 23 May 1957, pages 769-772.

[11] Crinson, M. and Lubbock, J. Art or Profession: three hundred years of architectural education in Britain, Manchester University Press, Manchester, 1994. 

[12] See Carolin, P. 2000 ‘A model for us all’, ARQ – Architectural Research Quarterly, volume 4, number 4, page 291. Most of the issue is given over to celebrating Leslie Martin’s achievements following his death in 2000, and the issue includes a reprint of his 1972 paper ‘The grid as a generator’.  

[13] King, D. 1995 ‘Research is at odds with architect’s education’, Architects’ Journal, vol 202, no. 5 p 19. 3 August 1995. 

[14] Fraser, M., ‘Classroom Conundrum’, Building Design, 18 July 2003, p. 7.

[15] Macmillan, S. 2010 Architectural research and its enemies, ARQ – Architectural Research Quarterly, vol 14, no 1, page 11-16

[16] Invitation to apply for Design Fellowships in Architecture: http://www.arct.cam.ac.uk/Downloads/design-fellows-july-2012 (

[17] Attwood, R. 2006 ‘Chance to Build for the Future’, Cambridge Evening News, 2 February 2006

[18] Macmillan, S. 1995 ‘The challenges ahead’ ARQ – Architectural Research Quarterly, vol 1, no. 1, pages 6-