Simulation of heat distribution in the human eye using discontinuous dual reciprocity boundary element method and non-overlapping domain decomposition approach

2020;
: pp. 1–13
https://doi.org/10.23939/mmc2020.01.001
Received: October 15, 2019
Revised: November 21, 2019
Accepted: November 22, 2019
1
Université Cadi Ayyad, Laboratoire de Mathématiques Appliquées et Informatique, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques
2
Université Cadi Ayyad, Laboratoire de Mathématiques Appliquées et Informatique, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques
3
Université Cadi Ayyad, Laboratoire de Mathématiques Appliquées et Informatique, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques

In this work, a numerical bi-dimensional simulation of heat distribution in the human eye is investigated.  A dual reciprocity boundary element method (DRBEM) is applied to obtain the heat distribution in the human eye.  The non-overlapping Dirichlet--Neumann domain decomposition method combined with DRBEM is used to find a more accurate representation of heat distribution in the human eye presented for two, three and four subdomains.  The result obtained are compared with literature experimental and numerical studies.  The simulations of proposed algorithms describe with sufficient accuracy the heat distribution in the human eye.

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Mathematical Modeling and Computing, Vol. 7, No. 1, pp. 1–13 (2020)