Systematic investigation of stresses in concentrically clamped bolted joints using the finite element method

2020;
: pp. 345–365
https://doi.org/10.23939/mmc2020.02.345
Received: May 07, 2020
Revised: August 04, 2020
Accepted: August 11, 2020
Authors:
1
Yildiz Technical University, Mechanical Engineering Faculty

In this paper, the systematic investigation of the stresses occurring in a rod bearing cap bolted joint is carried out by considering a concentrically clamped rod bearing cap bolted joint.  The aim of this study is to develop a 2D finite element model to determine occurring stress in bolted joints during all cases of bolted joint and to compare VDI-Directives.  For this aim, the bolt load and part load are analytically calculated based on the axial load.  The assembly stress, working stress, and alternating stress are calculated and simulated based on the  introduction of a load factor $n$.  A 2D finite element model is developed.  For this aim, the global stiffness matrix $[K]$ is obtained and the boundary conditions and load (such as force $[F]$ and moment $[M]$) are applied.  By solving algebraic equations of the system in terms of nodal displacement $\{u\}$ and $\{\theta\}$, we obtain assembly stresses $\sigma_v$, working stress $\sigma_B$ and alternating stress $\sigma_a$ in each element of the structure.  The finite element equations for the bolt are established.  The assembly stress, working stress, and alternating stress are calculated using the developed finite element model.  The analytical calculation results and finite element calculation results are compared and are found to be highly similar in terms of the assembly stress, working stress, and alternating stress.  Increasing the stiffness rate of the bolt causes the increase of the bolt load and alternating stresses; in contrast, increasing the stiffness rate of the clamp causes the decrease of the bolt load and alternating stresses.  The stiffness of the bolt should be as low as possible to reduce the maximum bolt load and stress of the bolt cross-sections.  However, the stiffness of the clamped part should be as high as possible.  Additionally, increasing the load introduction factor causes the increase of the bolt load.  Thus, for concentrically bolted joints,  increasing the load introduction factor causes the increase of the assembly stress and alternating stress.

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Mathematical Modeling and Computing, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 345–365 (2020)